FAQs

Below you’ll find the most frequently asked questions and their corresponding answers.

If you still have questions not answered below, contact us today for any additional information.

Will my concerns be kept confidential?

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Yes. The contact people and Akass Negotiator will only talk to someone else if you agree or (and this is very rare) if there is a safety issue.

Will this go on my record?

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No. Only statistical records are kept.

Won’t it escalate things if I go to Akass Negotiator ?

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The aim of negotiation is to keep things low-level and informal – and to find solutions.

Isn’t it better to sort it out "in the family", inside our department?

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Settlement Negotiation does keep things "in the family". Someone comes into your department or area to help you work it out. And it stays confidential.

Can I go to Akass Negotiator just for advice?

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Lots of people don’t want or need negotiation. They do want a confidential place to talk through a problem. While Akass Negotiator and the contact people don’t give advice, they do provide a framework and information so you can make a decision you’re happy with.

If someone wants me to go to Akass Negotiation, do I have to?

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No. Negotiation is voluntary and you can’t be compelled to take part. It’s a good idea to have a talk to Akass Negotiator, to find out more about the process before you make a final decision.

Can I bring any issue to Akass Negotiation?

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Yes, at Akass, we offer our services to tailor fit your issues at hand of any nature.

If I agree to talk to Akass Negotiator do I have to go ahead with Negotiation?

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No. Negotiation is voluntary and you make the decision about going ahead with your issues at hand.

If I go into Akass Negotiation will I have to agree to things I don’t like?

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No. So you only agree to things you want to agree to.

How confidential is the Akass Negotiation?

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Extremely Confidential. The discussion stays with the people in the room, unless you and the other person agree that you want to tell someone.

Isn’t Akass Settlement Negotiation just for big issues?

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No. It’s better and easier to have negotiation for little problems. No issue is too small.

Isn’t Akass Negotiation just for little issues?

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No. Negotiation is about restoring relationships and problems and it’s worth trying it even with very big problems. No issue is too big.

What if Akass Negotiation doesn’t work?

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Most of Akass Negotiation helps in solving problems and improving relationships.

What is a Akass Good Settlement Offer?

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Most cases are settle out of court before proceeding to trial. ... Several factors can provide guidance on whether the settlement should be accepted. In general, if you can get close to judgment value of the case in settlement, then it should be considered a very good settlement.

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What happens during Akass Settlement Negotiation?

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During each visit with Akass Negotiators, the parties discuss the amount of their demand or offer the settle, and the strengths and weaknesses highlighted by the other side. ... In a successful negotiation, the parties decide the outcomes of the case, rather than allowing a third party to do it for them.

Is it best to settle Out of Court?

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Most cases settle out of court before proceeding to trial. However, not all cases settle for what they should. ... In general, if you can get close to judgment value of the case in settlement, then it should be considered a very good settlement.

Why is it better to settle out of court?

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Settlement is faster, less expensive, and less risky. Most personal injury cases settle out of court, well before trial, and many settle before a personal injury lawsuit even needs to be filed. Settling out of court can provide a number of advantages over litigating a case through to the (often bitter) end.

What if They are More Powerful? - Developing a BATNA

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In the event that the other party has some negotiating advantage, Akass suggest that the answer is to improve the quality of your "best alternative to a negotiated agreement" ( your BATNA ).

What if They Won't Play or Use Dirty Tricks?

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AKASS’s answer to the resistant competitive negotiator is to "insist" on principled negotiation in a way that is most acceptable to the competitor. The principled negotiator might ask about the competitor's concerns, show he or she understands these concerns, and, in return, ask the competitor to recognize all concerns.

International Conflict, Dispute & Crisis
Settlements Negotiation Experts

We are not solicitors, a firm of solicitors, nor do we purport to be a firm of solicitors.